News

Time for a kosher hot dog and a beer and Dodger Baseball May 20 2015

We are still waiting for the kosher Dodger Dog.

The Stunt Show April 23 2015

Had a great time doing The Stunt Show on the Nachum Segal Network.

Best Pastrami Sandwich at Barclays Center is Kosher!!!! April 15 2015

When the Barclays Center opened in the autumn of 2012, it promised to be a boon to local business. To deliver on that vow, it launched Brooklyn Taste — a collection of no fewer than 55 Brooklyn-based food vendors scattered across multiple levels of the 18,000-seat arena. Most of these purveyors cook up event-friendly fare specific to the venue. Together they represent a wide spectrum of dining options indicative of their home borough's ethnic diversity. Dining at Barclays is unlike the predictable junk-food-fueled experience of a typical stadium. But as at any other sportsplex, it doesn't come cheap. To accommodate the constraints of your wallet — and stomach — we've assembled a list of the ten best dishes to seek out during your next Nets game, rock concert, or (next season) NHL match.

Hot Pastrami on Rye ($16.75), David's K Deli, Section 06

It can't be a proper Brooklyn experience without a decent Jewish deli. And the hot Abeles & Heymann pastrami served from David's K is beyond decent — it's delicious. More than half a pound of thinly sliced smoked meat is piled high betwixt two pieces of traditional rye bread. It's served without frills — just a small cup of slaw and an oversized sour pickle on the side.

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Beer Battered Salami Chips with Beer Mustard Written by Chanie Apfelbaum on February 26th, 2015 February 26 2015

 

Beer Battered Salami Chips with Beer Mustard

Written by chanie on February 26th, 2015

Oh yes I did. I made SALAMI. ON. STEROIDS.

And I didn’t have much choice either. I mean, there’s pretty much no outdoing my drunken hasselback salami, so I had to go there. And by there I mean, the deep fryer.

Ever since I read about a not-so-well-known custom to eat salami on Purim (to commemorate the hanging of HAMAN…hanging….salami….get it?), I’ve been banging out salami recipes for the holiday. Truth be told, I have no idea if this is a real thing, or if I happened upon a practical joke, but regardless, this taking-salami-to-the-next-level challenge has been a blast.

And it’s so ironic because I literally hated salami growing up. My mom used to feed us salami sandwiches for lunch every Friday afternoon. She’d smear ketchup on rye and top it with thick slices of salami all wrapped up in a foil package so we could take it along as we played in the courtyard of our building. One at a time, we’d chuck those salami sandwiches down the incinerator, and my mom was none the wiser! Fast forward some 20+ years and here. I. am.

Now when I think about this recipe, I have to admit, it’s like the ultimate guy food. It’s got beer, salami and it’s fried. I mean, seriously, could you ask for anything more?

Apparently you can. Because, not only did I come up with the ultimate finger food, I even made a beer dipping sauce, just to take the whole Purim thing over the top. Because that’s the way I roll. Or hang, apparently.

I’ve never made mustard from scratch before so I was excited to give it a try. There’s something really interesting I discovered about mustard in this recipe creation process. When mustard is exposed to heat, it loses it’s potency. (Same goes for horseradish and wasabi by the way)! I learned this by trying the same mustard recipe two ways – one used a bit more beer so I reduced it over heat, and the other I blended in the food processor to thicken, using no heat. The results were astounding! The blended mustard is super hot, while the cooked mustard is mildly sweet with little heat. Pretty awesome, right?

When the crispy salami and beer mustard meet, it’s the ultimate marriage. And it’s not just any salami, by the way. I used my favorite brand, Abeles & Heymann, because after visiting their factory a few months ago, and watching the salami-making process with my own eyes, I know their salami is made with the highest quality ingredients from start to finish!

And I wouldn’t think of coating that salami in anything less than the perfect crispy batter – which is what you get from beer batter. It’s super light and crisp, and let’s not forget, easy! Beer batter is just flour and beer and that’s it. Because the salami is packed with flavor, I don’t add much else, but you can always add a pinch of cayenne for some heat, if you’d like.

Now that we have the ultimate party food, lets discuss the Jewish holiday of Purim for a second! The Purim celebration is based upon the biblical Book of Esther, which recounts the story of Queen Esther and how she saved the Jewish people from annihilation at the hands of Haman (after whom the HAMANtasch is named). We celebrate with a festive feast (where these salami chips must make an appearance!), sending food gifts to family and friends, drinking until we don’t know the difference between the evil HAMAN and the righteous MOREDECHAI, and of course, dressing up as characters in the Purim story.

Growing up, Purim was always our favorite holiday, and you can imagine why. We got to dress up, deliver goodies to our friends and gorge on hamantaschen. As an adult, I love to put my own twist on the holiday with creative themes on my food gifts, fun twists on holiday cocktails and of course, crazy spins on salami!

If you live in Brooklyn, Queens or The Five Towns, be sure to check out my other salami recipe in the all new FYI Magazine! I’m so excited to join the team of FYI as the food editor, with a column for Fast & Fresh recipes as well as a Nutritious and Delicious section. This month, I’ve got a quick and easy salami quiche as well as a Persian twist on dried fruit truffles – perfect for your Purim feast or your Mishloach Manos.

Whether you choose to take on the Purim salami tradition or not, just remember to have fun and be joyous, because that’s what this holiday is all about! :) Happy Purim!

Salami making at the Abeles & Heymann factory with owner, Seth Levitt! This is the first and last time you will see me in a lab coat and hairnet ;)


More than Tradititon. Written by Esther Seif, student of Mr. Glazer, Bruriah High School Elizabeth, NJ January 29 2015

And when that very "kosher hotdog" has been produced by A&H one immediately understands its inherent perfection.

Hot Dog Eggroll recipe by Busy in Brooklyn December 22 2014

Hot Dog Eggrolls

Written by chanie on December 22nd, 2014

I don’t know about you, but as we inch our way towards the end of Chanukah, I’m slowly getting bored of all the dairy dishes I’ve been having. I’ve had my fill of donuts and latkes and I need something a little different! We still have a few more days to indulge in fried foods and I’ve got you covered. These hot dog eggrolls are just the thing!

Now, I know what you’re thinking. 6 days of loading up on trash and she’s trying to get me to eat hot dogs now?!  YES! You see, I had a huge misconception about hot dogs until I stepped into the Abeles & Heymann factory. Seth Leavitt, the company’s owner, took me behind the scenes for some hot dog education.

Before I even stepped foot in the factory, I had to stand in a box of cleaning solution, to clean my shoes before heading in. This level of hygiene continued throughout my tour, with every step of the process being meticulously clean. I even had to wear a hairnet and labcoat! (check out my Instagram feed for pics!)

Abeles & Heymann hot dogs can be found in stadiums around the country. And for good reason. They start with a REAL cut of meat. I always thought that hot dogs were made from complete junk but I was shocked to see the quality of the meat that’s used in it’s production. It looked just like any large roast you’d purchase at the butcher. From there, Abeles & Heymann uses old world recipes with quality ingredients to produce premium hot dogs that are slow cooked to perfection. Their franks contain no fillers, and their new reduced fat and sodium line has no added nitrates or nitrites!

Abeles & Heymann is at the forefront of an innovative campaign to create healthier alternatives to chemical and artificial nitrates. They have pioneered the use of natural nitrates, celery and cherry, to create a fully-cooked uncured collection of no-nitrate-added hot dogs. When Seth gave me a few packages to try, I turned to my most opinionated taste testers – my kids! My pickiest daughter, who can barely finish a single hot dog in one seating, asked for seconds. And I didn’t have to feel guilty about giving it to her! I would call that a winner!

Now that we don’t have to feel guilty about eating hot dogs, we can go ahead with our hot dog eggrolls! These crispy, dippable appetizers make the perfect addition to your Chanukah party, Superbowl bash, or New Years event! You can even bake them for a reduced fat version.

I filled the hot dog eggrolls with traditional frank condiments like sauerkraut and pickle relish. You can feel free to get creative with fillings like sauteed onions, facon, coleslaw or even chili! The dipping sauce combines sweet apricot jam with Abeles & Heymann’s sweet and tangy mustard for the perfect bite!

If you’re wondering where to pick up some Abeles & Heymann bounty, their amazing collection of hot dogs and salami’s can be found in stores throughout the U.S. Alternatively, you can purchase them online at theAbeles & Heymann store. And for a limited time, enjoy 15% off your order, using coupon code BUSY!


Don’t forget to check out the Abeles & Heymann blog and follow them onFacebook, Instagram and Twitter!


Table 4 Two interview November 14 2014

Check out the interview on Table 4 Two 

 

 


Club stores lead the way in kosher. October 07 2014

Club and Discount Stores Raise the Bar on Kosher, Led by Wal-Mart

By KT Staff Reporters

CHICAGO — It was nearly two years ago that a Wal-Mart spokesman revealed that the mega discounter carried kosher products in more than 500 stores, part of a growing trend where Club stores and discount chains like Costco, Sam’s Club, Target, and BJ’s were investing more in kosher. For Wal-Mart, its emergence as the nation’s largest grocer meant that it was only a matter of time that the mega discounter would challenge supermarkets with an emphasis on kosher. Every summer Wal-Mart becomes a serious competitor in kosher at its Catskills stores where sales are said to approach $3 million for just the 10 short weeks of the summer when tens of thousands of Jews descend on the Upstate New York resort area. But in its new store in Skokie, Wal-Mart is raising the bar on kosher with hundreds of kosher products, including Cholov Yisrael products and glatt kosher meats. Most notable in the new store is its rather impressive large signage of kosher aisles, special refrigerators and freezers and even bakery. Its average kosher section in many stores is about 12 square feet compared to 100 square feet for the Skokie store.

It is interesting that in Skokie, Wal-Mart will be taking on the impressive Kosher Marketplace in Jewel-Osco, the city’s largest interdependent exclusive kosher supermarket, Hungarian Kosher and the small Kol Tuv market. Soon to come will be a new Marriano’s supermarket that has already announced its intention of including a robust kosher section. But Wal-Mart is not alone in its quest for a share of the kosher market, as Costco continues to upgrade its kosher offerings as is Target and BJ’s. While many kosher purveyors expressed delight at the Wal-Mart development, they acknowledge that “it is still very much an experiment for them.” Said one: “They admit that they are learning a very complex subject but in the end the customer will decide just how far Wal-Mart goes.”


The "Bacon" Problem October 02 2014

The Bacon Problem

What Sizzles and Splatters and Almost Slithers?

Forbidden Meat: From fruit salad to sundaes, bacon can be found on just about everything these days. Some Jews are finding it hard to resist the food as its popularity grows.
Forbidden Meat: From fruit salad to sundaes, bacon can be found on just about everything these days. Some Jews are finding it hard to resist the food as its popularity grows.

By Lenore Skenazy

This is a tough moment to be a Jew. Not because of the sex scandals involving members of our tribe. Not because of calls for Israel’s withdrawal from this or that strip of land. (What else is new?) Not because of anti-Semitism here or abroad. No, it’s because we are living through an unprecedented Bacon Boom.

As you may have noticed, bacon has become the Snooki of snacks — a glistening, guilty pleasure that’s become ubiquitous. It’s on sundaes. In fruit salad. Baked into brownies. You can find the hipster ham in pretty much every food that has ever existed, with the possible exception of hamantaschen. And that’s not to mention the novelties! There’s bacon-flavored lip balm and bacon-flavored toothpicks and even bacon-scented floss, for folks trying to get that flavor stuck between their teeth. As you may have read right here, there have recently been sightings of burlesque beauties twirling real bacon tassels. And then there’s us Jews, looking on.

Jews and bacon go together like Samson and Delilah: We know we’re supposed to resist, but the flesh is weak. Heck, even the cartilage is kaput. Once the nose sniffs that sizzling scent of sin, all bets are off.

As a gal who used to dabble in BLTs but has since returned to the fold, all I can say is, thank God for a tasty alternative to Oscar Mayer. Because the pull of cured pork can be almost overwhelming.

How come? “I think it’s one of the most compelling flavors in the world, when done right,” said Al Marcus, a Houston Jew whose company, The Grateful Bread & Other Good Things, ships his homemade gourmet bacon across the country (but began by making ONLY challah). “I’ve become convinced that there is something in the human genetic makeup that favors food flavored with smoke. Maybe it’s a vestige of our cave-dweller ancestors.”

Or maybe it’s a vestige of our smoked fish eating uncles. Whatever, Marcus claims that his rabbi gave him his implicit blessing by noting that “many people in the community have done very well by bacon” — meaning that other local Jews who engaged in pork production were philanthropic with their profits.

But sometimes, the help that bacon can provide the Jews is even more direct. “During the depression,” Dallas dietitian Jessica Setnick said, “my Aunt Frances was diagnosed with rickets, and the doctor said she had to drink milk. She did not want to drink milk. His suggestion was for her mother to cook bacon and let her smell it cooking and tell her she could have it — if she drank her milk. So my Grandma Dora, who kept a kosher house, asked a neighbor to cook bacon with the window open for little Frances to be tempted by the aroma.”

And it worked! Frances drank her milk, cured her rickets and got to eat bacon as her reward.

Other times, God — or fate — is not as forgiving. Thirty-something Barbara Sanchez recalls, regarding the eating of bacon: “Oy! We were not permitted, ever.” But did that stop her? “Suffice to say, when our folks went on vacation for their 25th anniversary and my sister came home from college with her roommate (I was 14 years old), we tempted fate and bought bacon. Loved it! Bought a ham, too, and every time someone came in the door that week, we said, ‘Eat ham!’”

Then one day, they went to the Bronx to visit their aunt and uncle “and, to make a long story short, the car was stolen,” Sanchez said. “Did we take my sister’s crappy car? Noooo. We took my mom’s very nice Dodge Coronet that was probably turned into a cab. Needless to say, things didn’t go very well with the folks on their return. To this day, my sister and I swear the car was stolen because of bacon!”

Maybe she’s right. Maybe the laws of kashrut are hard and fast, and bacon exists for the same reason as Eve’s serpent. Clearly, the tension between pork and piousness has yet to be resolved, as Rocco Loosbrock can attest. Loosbrock is the owner of the upscale bacon purveyor Bacon Freak, in Ventura County, Calif. While he is not Jewish, he noticed something right away when he started shipping bacon gift baskets four years ago. “We read the gift messages that we get, and a whole lot of them end with one word. Can you guess what it is?” Loosbrock asked.

“Lipitor?”

Nope, Loosbrock says: “Mazel tov!” (Actually that’s two words, but how would a guy named Rocco know?) Someone somewhere is laughing. Who gets the last laugh, we do not know.

Lenore Skenazy is the author of the book “Free-Range Kids” (Wiley, 2010) and the founder of a blog of the same name.



Read more: http://forward.com/articles/139697/the-bacon-problem/#ixzz3EzQwgakF

West Coast Market September 30 2014

Glad to report the west coast market is still strong for A&H. Our products can be found in all the local independents from Western Kosher Markets on Pico and Fairfax,  to Pico Kosher Deli as well as Ralph's and Vanns. Keep up the good work California!!

Who makes the best kosher hot dog in america. September 22 2014

Top Dog: Who Makes the Best Kosher Hot Dog in America?

By Eli Cohn-Wein

ELI COHN-WEIN

Memorial Day is almost upon us, and it’s time to dust off that grill in the garage, fire it up and lay some franks down on it. The question is, are you really honoring the freedom your American forefathers fought for if you just get the same pack of Hebrew National every time you want some kosher dogs? What kind of freedom is that?

Thankfully, we live in a world with options, and we, here at the Forward, have tried out eight different varieties of kosher frankfurters to find out which will have the guests at your next BBQ plotzing. (Oh, and don’t forget mustard to top your dog.)

Scroll down to see which dog was crowned king.

8) Fairway All American Kosher Beef Frankfurter, $4.69 for a pack of 8
Despite the supermarket’s popularity among New Yorkers, Fairway’s branded dog leaves much to be desired. The skin of the dog is chewy when cooked, without the clean, satisfying “snap” of a normal dog. The dogs also tasted highly salted and had a lemony aftertaste that detracted from the meat.

7) Real Kosher Beef Frankfurters, $4.59 for a pack of 8
Real Kosher, which primarily does private labeling for smaller chain supermarkets, presents a dog that had a decent beef flavor with a nice spiced garlic aftertaste. We ran into problems, however, with both skin (almost non-existent) and texture, which was smooth in a way that tasted very processed.

6) Hebrew National Reduced Fat Beef Frankfurters, $4.99 for a Pack of 7
The first of two entries from the kosher hotdog goliath is the “diet” option they provide, which did clock in as the lowest fat dog, at only 9 grams per wiener. However, its sodium level was higher than a number of the non-diet dogs, so let’s not call it a health food just yet. Amazingly, the flavor is not particularly hurt by the lack of fat, with a sweet and spicy finish. It only sits at this low spot in our list because of the texture, which is mushy and underwhelming.

5) Jacks Gourmet Kosher Cured Bratwurst, $7.99 for a pack of 4
We allowed this one non-frankfurter in because it has the same basic ingredients as the rest of our dogs (water, salt, beef). Also, it looked yummy. And it did not disappoint — but it is distinctly not a hot dog. It tastes like a moist and meaty pepperoni, with a strong sage flavor. It also had the most satisfying skin of the dogs we ate, with a firm snap to the initial bite and a nice meaty texture throughout.

4) Lower East Side Premium Kosher Beef Frankfurters, $5.99 for a pack of 5
Lower East Side Franks is one of the aforementioned small chain labels produced by Real Kosher. The company is clearly giving away the good stuff, because while this variation did struggle with the same texture issues that the Real Kosher dogs did, their flavor was terrific, among the best of the group. Each bite had a nice blend of the hot dog trifecta (sweet/spicy/smoky) with a lovely meaty aftertaste.

3) Hebrew National Bun Length Beef Franks, $4.99 for a pack of 7
The standard held up well against its competition. What it lacks in the outstanding qualities of the other dogs (spice, texture, etc.) it makes up in its innate dog-ness. Perhaps because of its ubiquity in Jewish culture, a Hebrew National frank simply tastes like what a hot dog should taste like. There may be tastier options, but that may not matter to your taste buds’ memories.

2) Aaron’s Best Beef Franks, $6.99 for a pack of 8
The battle for the top spot was a tough one, with Aaron’s falling to a close second. This frank has a crisp bite, luxurious meaty flavor, and subtle smoky aftertaste. It only gets dinged for a slight lack of texture in the body. Still, it is an excellent option.

1) Abeles & Heymann Beef Frankfurters, $5.99 for a pack of 8
The “top dog” (oy) is Abeles and Heyman’s spectacular beef frank. It is the kosher dog of choice for both the Yankees and Mets, and upon tasting them it is clear that is no coincidence. Juicy and meaty with a crisp bite, an overt rich beef flavor, and a sweet garlic finish. Any Memorial Day with these on the grill will be a good one.



Read more: http://blogs.forward.com/the-jew-and-the-carrot/176755/top-dog-who-makes-the-best-kosher-hot-dog-in-amer/?#ixzz3E2ZNYHkj

10% OFF ALL ORDERS THROUGH OCT 16th. September 19 2014

Just in time for the holidays, we are offering 10% off all orders through October 16th. Use promo code 6IUE69XF18G4 at check out!! 

Interview September 05 2014

Check out my interview on Table 4 Two with Naomi Nachman. 

Labor Day August 29 2014

Looking forward to grilling up some delicious Abeles & Heymann hot dogs on Monday.

 


New products available. July 30 2014

Try our new beer or whiskey flavored hot dogs. Available now at a store near you!